Queen Ann's Lace, Wild Carrot - Daucus carota • (Parsley family - Umbelliferae)

 

Queen Ann's Lace, Wild Carrot - Daucus carota • (Parsley family - Umbelliferae) Flowers are tiny and indistinguishable; many, in a flat-topped umbel. Often a single tiny deep purple floret is in the center. Note the stiff 3-forked bracts below the main flower cluster. Leaves finely divided and subdivided. 2 - 3 ft. Roadsides, fields, dry waste ground. This very bristly and hairy weed plant has historic interest since the common garden carrot was derived from an Asiatic form of it. When crushed, the leaf gives off a carrot odor.

 

 

 

The roots of this so-called Wild Carrot can be cooked and eaten but excessive amounts will turn the skin yellow and jaundiced. The common name originated from the notion that the inflorescence resembled Queen Anne's lace headdress. Before the umbel is in full bloom, and again as the seed pod forms, it is hollow and has the shape of a bird's nest, which is another of its common names.

 

Previous Page